Indigenous Activist Michelle Chubb on What We All Lose When History Centers White Voices

Indigenous Activist Michelle Chubb on What We All Lose When History Centers White Voices
How Michelle Chubb Challenges the Dominant Narratives of History

Introduction

Michelle Chubb is not your average TikTok star. She is an Indigenous activist who uses her platform to share her culture and experiences as a Cree woman, and to raise awareness of issues affecting Indigenous communities, such as missing and murdered Indigenous women, environmental justice, and cultural appropriation. She is also a voice of resistance and empowerment, challenging the dominant narratives of history that center white voices and perspectives, and showing how this has negative consequences for everyone.

Michelle, who goes by the username @indigenous_baddie on TikTok, has over 2.6 million followers and more than 100 million likes on her videos. She started making videos in 2019, when she was 18 years old, as a way to cope with depression and anxiety. She soon realized that she had a powerful platform to educate and inspire others, especially young Indigenous people who often face discrimination and marginalization in their own lands.

“I want to show them that they’re not alone, that they have a voice, that they have a culture, that they have a history, that they have a future,” she said in an interview with CBC.

Michelle was born and raised in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, where she lives with her parents and four siblings. She is a member of the Norway House Cree Nation, and she speaks both English and Cree. She is currently studying social work at the University of Manitoba, and she hopes to become a counselor for Indigenous youth. She is also involved in various activism and advocacy projects, such as organizing rallies, speaking at events, and collaborating with other Indigenous influencers and organizations.

Michelle’s videos cover a wide range of topics, from personal stories and jokes, to cultural teachings and traditions, to social and political commentary and criticism. She often uses humor, sarcasm, and irony to make her points, and she does not shy away from calling out the injustices and oppression that Indigenous people face in Canada and around the world.

One of her most popular videos is about the true history of Thanksgiving, which is a day of mourning for many Indigenous people who have suffered genocide and oppression at the hands of colonizers. In the video, she sarcastically thanks the colonizers for bringing diseases, violence, and land theft to her ancestors, and then flips the script by saying that she is actually thankful for the resilience and strength of her people, who have survived and thrived despite the odds.

Another video that went viral is about the importance of respecting and honoring Indigenous cultures and traditions, such as pow wows, beadwork, and ceremonies. She explains how these practices are sacred and meaningful, and how they are often appropriated and exploited by non-Indigenous people for profit or entertainment. She urges her followers to learn from and appreciate Indigenous cultures, but not to steal or misuse them.

Michelle’s videos are not only informative and entertaining, but also impactful and influential. She has received messages from thousands of people, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, who have been inspired by her work and have learned from her perspective. She has also been featured in various media outlets, such as Vogue, Teen Vogue, and BuzzFeed, and has been recognized as one of the most influential young activists in Canada.

Michelle’s work is important and necessary, especially in a time when history has often marginalized and erased the voices of Indigenous people, and when their rights and lands are still under threat. By using her voice and influence to decolonize the world, she is showing how history can and should be rewritten, and how everyone can benefit from listening to and learning from Indigenous people and cultures.

How Michelle Chubb Challenges the Dominant Narratives of History

Michelle Chubb is not afraid to challenge the dominant narratives of history that center white voices and perspectives, and to show how this has negative consequences for everyone. She uses her videos and interviews to educate her followers about the true history of Indigenous people, and to celebrate their culture and traditions. She also advocates for social and environmental justice, and promotes Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination.

One of the ways that Michelle challenges the dominant narratives of history is by educating her followers about the true history of Thanksgiving, which is a day of mourning for many Indigenous people who have suffered genocide and oppression at the hands of colonizers. In one of her most popular videos, she sarcastically thanks the colonizers for bringing diseases, violence, and land theft to her ancestors, and then flips the script by saying that she is actually thankful for the resilience and strength of her people, who have survived and thrived despite the odds. She also explains how the story of the first Thanksgiving is a myth that erases the reality of the colonization and exploitation of Indigenous people and lands. She urges her followers to learn the truth and to support Indigenous causes, such as the National Day of Mourning, which is an annual protest held by Native Americans on Thanksgiving Day.

Another way that Michelle challenges the dominant narratives of history is by celebrating her culture and traditions, such as pow wows, beadwork, and ceremonies. She explains how these practices are sacred and meaningful, and how they are often appropriated and exploited by non-Indigenous people for profit or entertainment. She urges her followers to learn from and appreciate Indigenous cultures, but not to steal or misuse them. She also encourages other Indigenous youth to be proud of their identity and heritage, and to reconnect with their roots and ancestors. She often shares her own journey of learning and reclaiming her culture, such as learning her language, participating in ceremonies, and wearing traditional clothing and accessories. She also showcases the diversity and richness of Indigenous cultures and histories, and how they have contributed to the world in various ways.

Another way that Michelle challenges the dominant narratives of history is by advocating for social and environmental justice, and promoting Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination. She supports various Indigenous movements and campaigns, such as the Wet’suwet’en land defenders, who are fighting against a pipeline project that threatens their territory and rights. She also calls out racism and discrimination that Indigenous people face in Canada and around the world, such as the lack of clean water, the high rates of poverty and violence, and the systemic barriers and stereotypes that limit their opportunities and potential. She also promotes Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination, and how Indigenous people have the right to decide their own future and destiny, without interference or imposition from the state or other actors.

Michelle’s work is important and impactful, not only for Indigenous people, but also for non-Indigenous people who can learn from her and appreciate the diversity and richness of Indigenous cultures and histories. By challenging the dominant narratives of history, she is showing how history can and should be rewritten, and how everyone can benefit from listening to and learning from Indigenous people and cultures.

Why We All Need to Listen to and Learn from Indigenous People and Cultures

Michelle Chubb is an Indigenous activist who uses her TikTok platform to share her culture and experiences as a Cree woman, and to raise awareness of issues affecting Indigenous communities, such as missing and murdered Indigenous women, environmental justice, and cultural appropriation. She is also a voice of resistance and empowerment, challenging the dominant narratives of history that center white voices and perspectives, and showing how this has negative consequences for everyone.

She educates her followers about the true history of Indigenous people, and how they have suffered genocide and oppression at the hands of colonizers, such as the myth of the first Thanksgiving, which is a day of mourning for many Indigenous people. She celebrates her culture and traditions, such as pow wows, beadwork, and ceremonies, and how they are sacred and meaningful, and how they are often appropriated and exploited by non-Indigenous people for profit or entertainment. She advocates for social and environmental justice, and promotes Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination, and how Indigenous people have the right to decide their own future and destiny, without interference or imposition from the state or other actors.

Michelle’s work is important and impactful, not only for Indigenous people, but also for non-Indigenous people who can learn from her and appreciate the diversity and richness of Indigenous cultures and histories. By challenging the dominant narratives of history, she is showing how history can and should be rewritten, and how everyone can benefit from listening to and learning from Indigenous people and cultures.

Michelle Chubb is an example of a resilient, young Indigenous person who is using her voice and influence to decolonize the world and to inspire others to do the same. She is showing how Indigenous people are not victims, but survivors and leaders, who have a lot to offer and contribute to the world. She is also showing how Indigenous people are not monolithic, but diverse and dynamic, who have a lot to teach and share with the world.

We all need to listen to and learn from Indigenous people and cultures, because they have a lot of wisdom and knowledge that can help us understand ourselves and the world better. They have a lot of values and practices that can help us live more harmoniously and sustainably with ourselves, each other, and the environment. They have a lot of stories and histories that can help us challenge and change the status quo and the systems that oppress and exploit us.

How can we support Indigenous causes, how can we educate ourselves and others about Indigenous issues, or how can we celebrate and honor Indigenous people and cultures? These are some of the questions that we should ask ourselves and each other, as we follow Michelle Chubb’s example and join her in her mission to decolonize the world.

Written by Vikram

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