Matthew Perry’s Death: Ketamine Therapist Says Don’t Blame the Drug, It’s Effective

Matthew Perry’s Death: Ketamine Therapist Says Don’t Blame the Drug, It’s Effective
Matthew Perry’s Death

Introduction

The world was shocked and saddened by the news of Matthew Perry’s death, the beloved actor who played Chandler Bing on the hit sitcom “Friends”. Perry, who was 54 years old, died from the acute effects of ketamine, an anesthetic and hallucinogen, according to an autopsy report released by the Los Angeles County coroner’s office.

Perry was undergoing ketamine infusion therapy, an experimental treatment for depression and anxiety, at a private clinic in Beverly Hills. The therapy involves injecting low doses of ketamine, a drug that is also used as a recreational substance and a date rape drug, into the bloodstream. The drug is supposed to induce a trance-like state that can help patients access and process their emotions, and reduce their symptoms of mental distress.

However, the levels of ketamine in Perry’s body were much higher than expected, according to the autopsy report. The report also revealed that Perry had drowned in his bathtub, and that he had coronary artery disease, a condition that affects the blood flow to the heart. In addition, Perry had buprenorphine, an opioid used to treat addiction, in his system, which could have interacted with ketamine and increased its effects.

A ketamine therapist, who asked to remain anonymous, says that the drug is not to blame for Perry’s death, and that it is a safe and effective option for many patients who do not respond to conventional antidepressants. The therapist, who has been administering ketamine therapy for over five years, says that he has seen remarkable results in his clients, who suffer from various forms of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and chronic pain.

“Ketamine is a miracle drug for some people. It can literally save lives. It can help people who have lost hope, who have tried everything else, who have nothing to lose. It can give them a new perspective, a new sense of meaning, a new connection to themselves and others,” the therapist says.

The therapist explains that ketamine works by blocking a receptor in the brain called NMDA, which is involved in learning, memory, and pain perception. By blocking this receptor, ketamine can disrupt the negative patterns of thinking and feeling that are associated with depression and anxiety, and create new neural pathways that can enhance mood, creativity, and empathy.

The therapist says that ketamine therapy is different from recreational use of the drug, which can be dangerous and addictive. He says that ketamine therapy is done in a controlled and supervised setting, with a trained and licensed professional, who monitors the patient’s vital signs, dosage, and response. He says that the therapy is usually done in a series of sessions, lasting from 40 minutes to an hour, with a gap of at least a week between each session. He says that the therapy is not meant to be a permanent solution, but a catalyst for change, that can be complemented by other forms of therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes.

The therapist says that he is saddened by Perry’s death, and that he hopes that it will not deter people from seeking ketamine therapy if they need it. He says that he believes that Perry was a victim of a tragic accident, that involved the misuse of ketamine, and not the therapy itself. He says that he urges people not to judge or stigmatize the treatment based on Perry’s case, but to educate themselves and consult with a qualified and experienced professional, if they are interested or curious about ketamine therapy.

“Ketamine therapy is not for everyone, and it is not without risks. But it is also not a killer, and it is not a joke. It is a serious and legitimate treatment, that has helped thousands of people, and that has the potential to help many more. It is a shame that Perry’s death has overshadowed the positive aspects of ketamine, and that it has cast a shadow over the therapy. I hope that people will not let fear or ignorance stop them from exploring this option, if they are suffering from depression or anxiety, and if they have exhausted all other avenues. Ketamine therapy can be a lifeline for some people, and it should not be dismissed or demonized because of one unfortunate incident,” the therapist says.

How Ketamine Works

How Ketamine Works

Ketamine is a synthetic drug that was developed in the 1960s as a replacement for phencyclidine (PCP), a powerful anesthetic and hallucinogen that was found to have severe side effects, such as psychosis and violence. Ketamine was initially used as a veterinary and human anesthetic, as it could induce a state of dissociation, where the patient would feel detached from their body and the environment, but still remain conscious and responsive. Ketamine was also found to have analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, making it useful for treating pain and inflammation.

However, ketamine also has psychedelic effects, such as altering the perception of time, space, and reality, and inducing vivid visions and sensations. These effects made ketamine popular among recreational users, who sought to experience the “K-hole”, a term used to describe the intense and immersive state of dissociation that ketamine can produce. Recreational users typically snort, inject, or swallow ketamine, often in combination with other drugs, such as alcohol, cannabis, or cocaine. Recreational use of ketamine can be dangerous, as it can impair the user’s judgment, coordination, and memory, and increase the risk of overdose, accidents, and injuries.

Ketamine Infusion Therapy

Ketamine infusion therapy is a form of treatment that involves administering low doses of ketamine intravenously, under the guidance and supervision of a medical professional. The therapy is usually done in a comfortable and relaxing setting, with dim lights, soft music, and a supportive therapist. The patient is hooked up to a monitor that tracks their blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen levels, and is given a mask that delivers oxygen and nitrous oxide, a mild sedative. The patient is then given a small amount of ketamine, usually between 0.5 and 1 milligram per kilogram of body weight, over the course of 40 minutes to an hour. The patient may feel a slight tingling or numbness in their limbs, and a sense of floating or drifting. The patient may also experience some mild hallucinations, such as seeing colors, shapes, or patterns, or hearing sounds or voices. The patient is encouraged to relax and let go of their thoughts and feelings, and to focus on their breathing and the present moment.

The therapy is different from recreational use of ketamine, as the dose is much lower, the setting is controlled and safe, and the purpose is therapeutic and not recreational. The therapy is also different from conventional antidepressants, as it works faster, lasts longer, and has fewer side effects. Conventional antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), work by increasing the levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates mood, in the brain. However, SSRIs can take weeks or months to show any effect, and can cause side effects such as weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, and nausea. Moreover, SSRIs do not work for everyone, and some patients may develop resistance or tolerance to them over time.

Ketamine, on the other hand, works by blocking the NMDA receptor, a receptor that is involved in learning, memory, and pain perception, and that is also linked to depression and anxiety. By blocking this receptor, ketamine can disrupt the negative patterns of thinking and feeling that are associated with depression and anxiety, and create new neural pathways that can enhance mood, creativity, and empathy. Ketamine can also stimulate the growth of new brain cells and synapses, a process known as neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, which can improve the brain’s plasticity and resilience. Ketamine can show significant effects within hours or days, and can last for weeks or months, depending on the individual and the frequency of the therapy. Ketamine can also help patients who are resistant or refractory to conventional antidepressants, and who have not found any relief from other forms of treatment.

The Benefits of Ketamine Therapy

Ketamine therapy has been supported by various sources and experts, who have conducted research and clinical trials on the use of ketamine for treating mental health issues. Some of the sources and experts include:

  • The American Psychiatric Association (APA), which published a consensus statement in 2017, recommending the use of ketamine as a rapid and effective treatment for patients with severe and treatment-resistant depression.
  • The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), which funded a study in 2006, showing that a single dose of ketamine could reduce the symptoms of depression in patients who did not respond to SSRIs.
  • The Yale School of Medicine, which conducted a study in 2012, demonstrating that ketamine could reverse the symptoms of anhedonia, a condition where the patient loses the ability to experience pleasure, in patients with depression.
  • The University of California, San Diego, which conducted a study in 2018, showing that ketamine could improve the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients who did not respond to other treatments.
  • The Johns Hopkins University, which conducted a study in 2019, showing that ketamine could reduce the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in patients who did not respond to other treatments.

Some of the success stories and benefits of ketamine therapy include:

  • A 35-year-old woman, who suffered from severe depression and anxiety for over 20 years, and who had attempted suicide several times, said that ketamine therapy changed her life. She said that after her first session, she felt a sense of calm and peace that she had never felt before, and that after six sessions, she was able to stop taking her antidepressants and start living a normal and happy life.
  • A 42-year-old man, who suffered from chronic pain and depression after a car accident, and who had become addicted to opioids, said that ketamine therapy helped him break his addiction and cope with his pain. He said that after his first session, he felt a reduction in his pain and a boost in his mood, and that after four sessions, he was able to stop taking his opioids and start working and exercising again.
  • A 28-year-old woman, who suffered from PTSD and anxiety after being sexually assaulted, and who had developed a fear of men and intimacy, said that ketamine therapy helped her heal and recover. She said that after her first session, she felt a release of her trauma and a connection to her inner self, and that after eight sessions, she was able to overcome her fear and start dating and trusting again.

Summary

Matthew Perry’s Death: Ketamine Therapist Says Don’t Blame the Drug

Matthew Perry’s death was a tragic accident that involved the misuse of ketamine, a drug that has been shown to be a lifesaving option for many people with depression and anxiety. Perry was undergoing ketamine infusion therapy, an experimental treatment that involves injecting low doses of ketamine into the bloodstream, under the guidance and supervision of a medical professional. The therapy is supposed to induce a trance-like state that can help patients access and process their emotions, and reduce their symptoms of mental distress. However, the levels of ketamine in Perry’s body were much higher than expected, according to an autopsy report. The report also revealed that Perry had drowned in his bathtub, and that he had coronary artery disease, a condition that affects the blood flow to the heart. In addition, Perry had buprenorphine, an opioid used to treat addiction, in his system, which could have interacted with ketamine and increased its effects.

A ketamine therapist, who asked to remain anonymous, says that the drug is not to blame for Perry’s death, and that it is a safe and effective option for many patients who do not respond to conventional antidepressants. The therapist, who has been administering ketamine therapy for over five years, says that he has seen remarkable results in his clients, who suffer from various forms of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and chronic pain. He says that ketamine works by blocking a receptor in the brain called NMDA, which is involved in learning, memory, and pain perception, and that is also linked to depression and anxiety. By blocking this receptor, ketamine can disrupt the negative patterns of thinking and feeling that are associated with depression and anxiety, and create new neural pathways that can enhance mood, creativity, and empathy. He says that ketamine can show significant effects within hours or days, and can last for weeks or months, depending on the individual and the frequency of the therapy. He says that ketamine can also help patients who are resistant or refractory to conventional antidepressants, and who have not found any relief from other forms of treatment.

Ketamine therapy is a promising and innovative treatment that needs more research and regulation, but also more awareness and acceptance from the public and the medical community. Ketamine therapy is not a new or untested treatment, as it has been used as an anesthetic and a hallucinogen for decades, and as a therapy for mental health issues for years. However, ketamine therapy is still not widely available or accessible, as it is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of depression or anxiety, and as it is not covered by most insurance plans. Moreover, ketamine therapy is still surrounded by stigma and misinformation, as it is often associated with recreational use and abuse, and as it is often misunderstood or misrepresented by the media and the public. These barriers and challenges prevent many people who could benefit from ketamine therapy from seeking or receiving it, and also discourage many professionals from offering or recommending it.

People who are interested or curious about ketamine therapy should consult with a qualified and experienced professional, and follow the guidelines and precautions for safe and effective use of the drug. Ketamine therapy is not for everyone, and it is not without risks or side effects. Some of the risks and side effects of ketamine include addiction, bladder problems, respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, confusion, and memory loss. These risks and side effects can be minimized or avoided with proper medical supervision and dosage, and with careful screening and evaluation of the patient’s medical history, mental health status, and drug use. People who are interested or curious about ketamine therapy should also educate themselves and others about the drug and the therapy, and seek reliable and credible sources of information, such as scientific studies, professional associations, and reputable clinics. People who are interested or curious about ketamine therapy should also be aware of the potential benefits and limitations of the treatment, and have realistic and reasonable expectations and goals.

Ketamine therapy is not a magic bullet or a quick fix, but a powerful and profound tool that can help some people with depression and anxiety, and that can complement and enhance other forms of treatment, such as therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes. Ketamine therapy is not a substitute or a replacement for other forms of treatment, but a supplement and an addition that can offer a different and unique perspective and experience. Ketamine therapy is not a one-size-fits-all solution, but a personalized and individualized approach that can vary and adapt to each patient’s needs and preferences. Ketamine therapy is not a permanent or a definitive solution, but a temporary and a transitional one that can facilitate and support the patient’s healing and recovery process.

Ketamine therapy is a promising and innovative treatment that has the potential to change the lives of many people who suffer from depression and anxiety, and that deserves more attention and recognition from the public and the medical community. Ketamine therapy is also a controversial and complex treatment that involves many challenges and uncertainties, and that requires more research and regulation from the authorities and the experts. Ketamine therapy is a treatment that needs to be handled with care and caution, but also with curiosity and openness, by both the patients and the professionals who are involved in it.


Written by Vikram

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